Girl Wash Your Face Author Rachel Hollis Responds To Privilege Backlash By Comparing Herself To Harriet Tubman!

Girl Wash Your Face Author Rachel Hollis Responds To Privilege Backlash By Comparing Herself To Harriet Tubman!

Fans are begging Girl, Stop Apologizing author Rachel Hollis to take her own advice following backlash that keeps getting worse with every apology she makes!

Recently, the self-help influencer and author went viral for a very problematic TikTok in which she admitted she was “privileged” and “unrelatable” because she has someone who cleans her toilets, but claimed she’s only successful because she simply worked harder than everyone else and got up “at 4 a.m.” every morning.

To make matters worse, the scribe invoked the names of other women she thought were just as “unrelatable” as her, like Nobel Laureate/human rights advocate Malala Yousafzai and abolitionist Harriet Tubman, who used the Underground Railroad to help bring countless enslaved people to freedom.

The tone-deaf post was deleted, but captured by others on social media. See (below):

Naturally, comparing herself to women of color — who also happen to be some of the most iconic women in history — didn’t sit well with social media users. Hollis tried to do damage control by issuing an apology of sorts, but that only caused more backlash.

In the since-deleted post, Rachel said she thought that mentioning her “cleaner” would make her more “relatable” so fans knew she didn’t do everything on her own. She also blamed her “team” for the controversy getting out of hand, sharing that they told her not to respond and allow it to blow over, and admitting that they deleted certain comments.

For some reason, Rachel tagged best-selling author and speaker Luvvie Ajayi in the apology, which only made the situation worse. Ajayi responded with multiple tweets, with one directly to Hollis that read:

“Rachel Hollis tagging me in that apology. Ma’am… why would you think it was a good idea? Where are her friends?”

Ajayi went on to reveal that, because of the tag, she had received several DMs “full of Beckery,” with Hollis’ fans blaming her for not “educating” the California native.

Other luminaries called Hollis out, too. Writer and podcaster Jen Kinney wrote:

“Don’t let Rachel Hollis fool you with ‘I’m not trying to be relatable.’ After a year of intense public discourse on race, privilege, and systemic oppression, she chose to use her platform to peddle the myth of meritocracy and pander to her target market: whiteness and privilege.”

In an Instagram Live, media personality Jam Gamble said Hollis has “no right to use the word community, because the minute you say that you are not trying to be relatable, you have let go of your community. And by being ‘unrelatable,’ you have told your people, thank you for getting me to this point, I no longer need you. Goodbye. That is reckless behavior.”

But a social media user named Carly possibly put it the best, writing:

“Rachel Hollis might be able to afford a housekeeper bc she “gets up at 4am and works her ass off every day”, but I can almost guarantee that housekeeper does the same thing – but for multiple houses a day and they’ll never become a CEO.”

After the second wave of backlash, Hollis once again took to IG to post an apology. In it, she acknowledged causing “tremendous pain,” and that she’s “diminished the struggles and hard work of many people.” She also admitted to having privilege, but alluded to how she “grew up” in a working class family.

Okay. No one’s saying Rachel didn’t work hard, but girl, we all gotta check our privilege! We’re not saying becoming a best selling author is easy, but the world we live in is undoubtedly easier to navigate when you’re a white, cisgender, heterosexual, able-bodied person — which Rachel is.  Many are saying that her not acknowledging this implies that everyone who isn’t as successful as her just simply isn’t working hard enough.

Thoughts??

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