King Charles III and his wife Camilla pay tribute to brave Anzacs

King Charles III and his wife Camilla pay tribute to brave Anzacs

King Charles III and his wife Camilla pay tribute to brave Australian and New Zealand troops who served and died in wars around the world

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  • Royals tweeted a series of photos from Anzac Day services

The Royal Family have paid their respects to the Australian and New Zealand servicemen and women who served and died in wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations.

The Royals shared a series of photos on Twitter of King Charles III and his wife Camilla, the Queen Consort, attending various Anzac Day services over the years.

In one photo, a sombre King Charles lays a wreath at the foot of a war statue, while in another, the pair are seen fixing bright red poppies to a large remembrance wall.

‘This Anzac Day, we pay tribute to all the men and women in the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, who served and died in wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations,’ the tweet read.

The Royal Family have paid their respects to the Australian and New Zealand servicemen and women who lost their lives while serving the Commonwealth

The Royals tweeted a series of photos of King Charles III and Camilla, the Queen Consort, attending various Anzac Day services over the years

King Charles III began his military career at the age of 23 with the Royal Air Force, training as a jet pilot at the RAF College in Cranwell in 1971.

The monarch later began his active service on the guided missile destroyer HMS Norfolk and later trained as a helicopter pilot.

Before becoming the head of the British Armed Forces, King Charles made his way up the ranks in all three branches of the armed forces.

The monarch was promoted to Admiral in the Royal Navy, General in the Army and Air Chief Marshal in the Royal Air Force in 2006.

On ascension to the throne, Charles has become head of the British Armed Forces.

Anzac Day has been commemorated in London since the first anniversary of the Anzac landings when King George V attended a service at Westminster Abbey.

In one photo, a sombre King Charles lays a wreath at the foot of a war statue, while in another the pair fix bright red poppies to a large remembrance wall

Since then, the services have become an important moment for thousands of expatriates and visiting New Zealanders and Australians.

Last September, King Charles penned a heartfelt letter expressing his deep gratitude and appreciation for Australian troops for their courage during the 70-year reign of his late mother, Queen Elizabeth II.

The letter was addressed to the Australian Defence Force chief on a Buckingham Palace letterhead, and was sent five weeks after Her Majesty’s death.

‘On the occasion of my accession to the sovereignty, I would like to send to all who serve in the Australian Defence Force my heartfelt gratitude for the unstinting loyalty and professionalism you displayed through the reign of my beloved mother,’ King Charles’ message begins.

‘I know that The Queen took the greatest possible pride in the way servicemen and women from Australia performed in their duties in many parts of the world and often in the most testing and difficult circumstances.’

Anzac Day has been commemorated in London since the first anniversary of the Anzac landings when King George V attended a service at Westminster Abbey

The letter ends with King Charles sharing his late mother’s high regard for the courage and commitment of Australian troops.

‘I know, for my part, that you will continue to serve your country with the dedication and bravery which you have demonstrated with such success over the years.’

It comes as thousands of Australians take to pubs across the country to sink beers and play a traditional game of two-up as Anzac Day commemorations get underway.

Earlier in the day, Australians gathered in the chilly dawn at public ceremonies, where the Last Post was heard, and wreaths were laid.

Tuesday marks the 108th anniversary of the landings at Gallipoli. Over 50,000 Australians served during the eight-month campaign; over 8,700 lost their lives, while 18,000 were wounded.

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