New York City proposes 24-hour nightlife district

New York City proposes 24-hour nightlife district

Party on! New York City proposes 24-hour nightlife districts for bars and clubs in areas of ‘low residential density’

  • New York’s Office of Nightlife is recommending that officials identify areas with low residential density where a limited 24-hour district could be tested 
  • The recommendation is contained in a 160-page report issued this month by the nightlife office 
  • The report does not indicate which neighborhoods the city is considering for the 24-hour nightlife district 
  • Using Amsterdam as an example, the report notes that the city started allowing nightlife venues to apply for 24-hour licenses back in 2012 

New York City has proposed setting up a 24-hour nightlife district where revelers can party all night. 

The city’s Office of Nightlife is recommending that officials identify areas with low residential density where a limited 24-hour district could be tested. 

The recommendation is contained in a 160-page report issued this month by the nightlife office.  

The report does not indicate which neighborhoods the city is considering for the 24-hour nightlife district but says it has to be where there won’t be ‘nuisance complaints or other conflicts’. 

New York City’s Office of Nightlife is recommending that officials identify areas with low residential density where a limited 24-hour district could be tested

‘Cities around the world are expanding the way institutions and businesses can operate at night, as limitations on closing hours have pushed late night activity to unlicensed venues, sometimes coming into conflict with residential uses,’ the report says. 

‘Uniform closing hours for nightlife businesses can result in groups of people congregating in the street, elevating tensions between patrons and residents.

‘In residential areas, nightlife and music venues can create noise and attract traffic that draws complaints from neighboring residents. Allowing 24-hour use in specified districts, if implemented properly, can help people to move at their own pace and reduce conflicts.’ 

Using Amsterdam as an example, the report notes that the city started allowing nightlife venues to apply for 24-hour licenses back in 2012. 

The report says Amsterdam developed ‘strict criteria for potential applicants that included cultural significance, accessibility to public transportation, and locations without ‘inconvenience to local residents’.’ 

‘Approximately a dozen venues hold this extended hours permit, which allows for safer, more coordinated late-night activity throughout the city,’ the report says. 

The Office of Nightlife is now planning to work with other city officials to find potential neighborhoods for where the 24-hour district can be tested. 

The recommendation is contained in a 160-page report issued this month by the nightlife office. It does not indicate which neighborhoods the city is considering for the 24-hour nightlife district

New York City’s Office of Nightlife, which is part of the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment, was created by Bill de Blasio in 2017.

It aims to serve as a liaison between nightlife operators and city enforcement agencies.

De Blasio’s mayoral term ends in November. 

It comes at a time when police are grappling with crowds of rowdy partygoers gathering after-hours in New York City parks.

Police in riot gear forcibly removed revelers from an all-night rave in Manhattan’s Washington Square Park during July 4 celebrations.

Six people were arrested as a result.  

The public park in the heart of the Big Apple has been a growing source of tension in recent weeks with residents and ravers coming to blows.

With bars and restaurants facing tight restrictions over the last year due to the pandemic, it increasingly transformed into a popular party destination.

Hundreds have been seen gathering for nightly raves in defiance of a midnight curfew, with people dancing and drinking into the early hours.

Impromptu boxing matches, complete with referees and time keepers, have also become a fixture.

Residents have complained about the noise as well as increased drug use and violence in the park, claiming they are scared to walk around the area at night. 

It comes at a time when police are grappling with crowds of rowdy partygoers gathering after-hours in New York City parks. Pictured above is a rave in Manhattan’s Washington Square Park

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