Nightclubs will not ask patrons for Covid passports on Freedom day

Nightclubs will not ask patrons for Covid passports on Freedom day

Vast majority of Britain’s clubs and cinemas will NOT ask customers to show Covid passports, industry leaders reveal

  • People in England will no longer be legally obliged to wear face masks on July 19
  • The majority of nightclubs said they will not ask for Covid passports for patrons
  • Many operators said they will reopen without masks and at full capacity  

The vast majority of nightclubs and cinemas will not require customers to provide Covid passports when they reopen from Monday, industry leaders said yesterday.

Britons will no longer be legally required to wear face masks or socially distance from July 19, but Boris Johnson has encouraged nightclubs and other venues with large crowds to use vaccine passports as a ‘matter of social responsibility’.

Yesterday the Night Time Industries Association said more than four out of five of its members will not ask customers to produce proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test as a requirement for entry.

Nightclub owners will not insist staff or patrons will need to socially distance or wear masks once they reopen next week

Two of the UK’s biggest nightclub chains, Rekom UK and Tokyo Industries, have already said they will reopen at full capacity from next week without vaccine passports

Two of the UK’s biggest nightclub chains, Rekom UK and Tokyo Industries, have already said they will reopen at full capacity from next week without vaccine passports. The UK Cinema Association said ‘the overwhelming majority’ of its members oppose the passports, which are not currently required by law, but the Government has alarmed businesses by reserving the right to make them compulsory if infections spike.

Toby Bradon, of cinema chain Vue UK, which has 90 venues, said: ‘As an industry, we don’t believe that the use of Covid status certificates or passports will make the cinema experience a safer one and there are also at the same time significant issues in terms of discrimination. We believe it will build a significant barrier between the sector, the industry and its customers when we are trying to rebuild the business.’

Michael Kill, of NTIA, said the measure was ‘disproportionate’, difficult to police and discriminated against young customers who have not been double jabbed.

Critics have also said the plans invade people’s privacy by asking them to present personal information about their health to access events and services.

But other industries, including theatre, music venues and festivals, have welcomed the passports as a means to kick-start the summer after months of restrictions.

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